Archive | How To Fade Hair

How To Cut A Flat Top Hairstyle

Flat Top Hairstyle

Learn how to cut a flat top hairstyle in the following video and step by step guide. Also, learn how to finish off the cut with the correct styling products to keep the cut looking consistent all day.

  1. Start on the right hand side. Use  the 3 ½  (3/8”) blade on the detachable blade clipper. Using the fading technique run the clipper up the side of the head to the temple area. Take an imaginary line parallel to the head straight up from the round of the head until you run out of hair. This will avoid leaving a line that needs to be blended out. Make sure not to follow the contour of the head at the parietal area.
  2. Work the clipper around the head until you get to the back. Run the clipper up to the crown and round it off slightly. Even though this haircut is square in shape the back needs to be rounded off slightly for proper balance.
  3. After the back continue on around the opposite side as in step 3.
  4. Next, blend the sides and back to the top. Even though the top has not been cut yet the corners need the square look from a front and back view. It will be much easier to cut the top flat when there is less hair to work with. Use the clipper over comb technique and either a 1 or 1 ½ blade depending on the thickness of the hair. U Hold the comb parallel to the head and take an imaginary line straight up in the air until you run out of hair to cut.
  5. Move on to the semi-finish. Use adjustable clipper starting in the longest setting working down to the shortest setting.
  6. Finish the taper with the adjustable clipper working down from the longest to shortest setting.
  7. Complete the finish with the t-trimmer using it correctly as demonstrated in tools of the trade lessons.
  8. After these steps are completed move on to the top. Blow dry the top with a small amount of alcohol free Zorian of New York firm hold styling gel to get an even shape to work with.
  9. Using the large flat top comb and a clipper over comb technique with the 1 blade. Begin in the front and work towards the back. Keep the comb parallel with the floor and comb through the first section in the center.  Very small sections will be needed to avoid clipper marks or lines. Move the comb very slowly toward the back angling the comb slightly downward to meet the guide from the sides and back zone.
  10. Move to either the right or left side of the center section and repeat the process. Make sure the center guide and previous guide are visible. This will help to keep the correct speed and sectioning with the comb. Take as many sections as necessary to meet the guide on the sides.
  11. Repeat the above step on opposite side.
  12. When rough cut is complete re-dry the hair with more product for the fine-tuning. Check from every angle in both the wall and hand mirrors.
  13. Touch up any areas that need it.
  14. Lastly, use a fingertip portion of the Zorian Of New York shaping paste for a strong hold and matte finish to hold this difficult growth pattern in place all day. (Optional: Spray with Zorian Of New York finish spray for a non sticky, quick dry finish for added hold)

For more information on customized classes at your barbershop, salon, school, or private training e-mail Greg@HowToCutHair.tv. For more information on becoming a premium retailer of Zorian Of New York men’s products contact Greg@ZorianOfNewYork.com or fill out our wholesale form.

Comb Over with Hard Part

The Comb over with hard part is the most popular haircut in the barbering world today. I have been in the industry as a service provider and educator for over two decades and it is always interesting and fun to keep up with the changes on the classic haircuts. This particular cut when I started was referred to as a regular boy’s haircut. Now with the modern/retro twist (this is actually a 1920’s style) the name has changed and so have some of the techniques. Such as when I started no one would ever think of taking a straight razor and shave in the part area. Also, pomades were just starting to get popular but most haircuts were styled with gel, hair spray, or a combination of the two.

In this video you will learn many different barbering techniques including: barber shear over comb, thinning shear over comb, fading, blending, and straight razor shaving. You will also learn the finer points on the hand dexterity necessary for these techniques. In other words: how to hold the comb, shears, clippers, and straight razor properly allowing for the correct posture as well as optimum finished results.

For this particular haircut we have combined three different styles into one: a side part, an ivy league, and a hard part. The side part is self-explanatory. A classic young man’s haircut. The Ivy League takes it a step further. We cut the crown off and blend it to the top making it much easier to style. Works especially well for young children with difficult cowlicks and just want to get up and go. Lastly, the hard part. We first cut in the part with the trimmer and follow up with the straight razor. In this case we used our Zorian Of New York Shave Gel to get a nice clean line. It is a thick transparent gel infused with aloe vera and shea butter to form a protective barrier between the skin and razor and allow for ultimate comfort without razor burn.

Finally, to complete the finish product comes the styling portion. Very few short haircuts look good without spending some time styling and using one or two products. To get the perfect finished looked we created the shape by blowing drying the hair into place with a small amount of our Zorian Of New York firm hold gel. This will give the straight hair some body and mold difficult hair into place. Lastly, we apply the Zorian Of New York water soluble classic pomade for a high shine which will make the hard part stand out even more and give the hair a strong hold that will last all day. It is very important that the hair is completely dry when the pomade is applied. If the hair is slightly damp it will dilute the product and will not firm up and give the hair a firm hold.

How To Give A Fade Haircut With Scars

One of the most important things to consider when you are learning how to fade hair is how high or how low you are going to cut it. There are a lot of things to consider as you think about this question. Some of them include cowlicks, hair thickness, hair color, head shape, surface of the scalp (lumps, bumps, and/or dents), moles, scars, customer’s age, customer’s job, desired hairstyle, and the customer’s preference.

A very important note to keep in mind is that no matter how good you are at fading hair, if the fade is too high or too low your customer will not think it is a good haircut. If the haircut is 100% technically correct but it is not exactly what the customer wants they won’t be happy. This is especially true with the fade haircut customer. It doesn’t matter if they are a young kid or older suit and tie professional. These are the most particular and hardest customers to please.

This blog will teach how to give a fade haircut with scars. When you are asking the customer how high they like their fade make sure to ask them if they have any scars. If you are uncomfortable asking the customer that question, just spend an extra few seconds combing through the hair in an upward motion so when the hair is lifted up you will see if they have any scars. You will most likely find scars in 2 areas. In the temple region and/or on the occipital area which is just above the nape of the neck. If the scars are any lower than that there is not a lot that can be done. They are most likely going to show no matter what. Just make sure the customer is aware of that before you cut their fade.

If you find scars in the higher areas leave the hair thicker or darker in those areas and fade the hair low. When  cutting the fade start arching the blade or floating the blade away from the scalp about ½ inch below the scars so you have room to fade the hair just below the them. If you go any higher you will run into the scars and they will show.

Learn How To Fade Hair

One of the most important things to consider when you learn how to fade hair is how high or how low the fade should be cut. There are a lot of things to consider as you think about this question. Some of them include cowlicks, hair thickness, hair color, the length of the bangs, shape of the head, surface of the scalp (lumps, bumps, and/or dents), moles, scars, customer’s age, customer’s job, desired hairstyle, and the customer’s preference.

A very important note to keep in mind is that no matter how good you are at fading hair, if the fade is too high or too low your customer will not think it is a good haircut. If the haircut is 100% technically correct but it is not exactly what the customer wants they won’t be happy. This is especially true with the fade haircut customer. It doesn’t matter if they are a young kid or older suit and tie professional. These are the most particular and hardest customers to please.

This blog is going to cover how high to cut the fade in relation to the length of the bangs. The height of the fade should be balanced properly with the length of the bangs. The fade should never be higher than the bangs.

This is a little tricky because with most of today’s styles the bangs are either pushed up, combed to the side, or brushed straight back. For these styles cut the top first and then comb the bangs straight forward before beginning the fade. When you are clipper cutting the sides, start arching the clipper away from the head about a half of an inch below the bangs. This will leave enough room to blend the sides to the top without fading the hair too high.

This is a little easier with the shorter styles that get an edge-up. Make sure to leave yourself enough room so the fade stops where the edge-up in the temple and forehead begins. This will ensure the proper balance.

Fade Haircut Tips

In previous blogs I wrote about why it is not a good idea to cut by numbers. In this blog I am going to give you fade haircut tips on how to explain to the customer how they get their haircut. This will also be how they ask for their haircut next time they come into the shop or salon.

When talking with the customer about how to ask for their fade haircut there a couple of ways to go about it. You can ask them to point out where they like their fade; Low (just above the ear and below the occipital bone), medium (halfway to the temple area and the middle of the occipital bone), or high (to the temple area and above the occipital bone).

I personally like to measure the fade by the width of my fingers. Here are  some fade haircut tips on how to explain or have your customer ask for their fade:

–         3 finger 3/8” taper

–         3 finger 3/8” taper with a 1finger 1/16” taper around the outline

–         ½” Taper

–         2 finger ¼” Taper

These are just a few and you can come up with any combination. I will usually write this down on the back of a business card for the customer to carry with them so they know how to ask for their haircut next time. It makes the haircut sound much more detailed and is another reason for your customer to keep coming back to you.

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